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Article Linux Productivity

Take Your Linux Workspace Anywhere: Backup for Nerds

How many times have you sat down at a new Linux computer and felt like you were starting all over again? All of those aliases, every little helper file and script - gone. This new computer is a shell of its former self (pun intended). Your heart warms as you think back to the comfort and productivity that came with your Linux workstation at home. If only there were a way to take everything you know and love on the go…

Thankfully, there is!

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Article Linux

Push Out Your SSH Keys – Jump Nodes in a Jiffy!

Every day, system administrators, students, professors, and everyday computer users struggle with entering their password on the command line. With each passing jump from one system to another, ten seconds tick by. Whoops, that’s a mistake – make it 30!

Over time, entering your password every time you want to move between nodes using SSH can become a real hassle. The benefits from “pushing out” your SSH keys, or making all of the nodes you typically jump to trust your public key, will save you more time with every use, snowballing from seconds, to minutes, to hours!

This article describes two ways of pushing out your keys: The easy way, and the hard way.

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Article Linux

Breaking Free from User Space: Writing Your First Kernel Module

This post is Part 3 of a series on the Linux kernel.

Part 1 – Part 2

So we’ve already built the kernel from source and even modified the source code. While these were some pretty cool parlor tricks, isn’t it about time we learned something useful?

Well, I can’t promise that, but today we’ll take a step in the right direction by building a Linux kernel module.

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Article Linux

Making Simple Modifications to the Linux Source

This post is Part 2 of a series on the Linux kernel.

Part 1 – Part 3

The Linux kernel is one of the most complex open-source projects available to the public, and the source code that comprises it is highly intricate, to say the least. Knowing this, I wondered what it would take to pick apart such a technological beast and actually begin to understand it. The key to understanding, like anything else, is to learn by doing. The entire source repository is available to view in a browser, and more than 95% of it is written in C. How hard could it be to write a little C code?

As it turns out, it’s harder than expected. Keep reading to get the full rundown on how I edited the kernel source, built it, broke it (several times), and finally made a simple change that produced an output in the system logs.

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Article Linux

How to Compile the Linux Kernel from Source

This post is Part 1 of a series on the Linux kernel.

Part 2 – Part 3

Linux is everywhere, and there are plenty of Linux distributions available providing great out-of-the-box features. But what happens when you need to make an intricate, low-level change to system functionality? What if you wanted to get into kernel development and start to understand one of the world’s largest open source projects?